Blogs > The Examining Room

The latest in medical research, news and commentaries, from New Haven and around the world.

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

2 Yale professors win Endocrine Society awards

Two Yale University professors are among 11 winners of The Endocrine Society’s 2012 Laureate Awards. The awards were established in 1944 to recognize the highest achievements in endocrinology including science, leadership, teaching and service.

The awards will be presented at ENDO 2012, the 94th Annual Meeting and Expo, being held June 23-26, in Houston.

The winners from Yale are Tamas Horvath and Gerald Shulman.

• Tamas Horvath, Ph.D., won the Ernst Oppenheimer Award. This annual award is presented to young investigators in recognition of accomplishments in the field of basic or clinical endocrinology. Horvath’s work over the last 15 years has played a key role in the development of the currently accepted model of neuroendocrine regulation of energy balance. His research has helped explain several of the missing links of periphery-brain communication in the control of body weight and metabolism. Horvath resides in New Haven.

• Gerald Shulman, M.D., Ph.D., is winner of the Clinical Investigator Award Lecture. This annual award honors an internationally recognized clinical investigator who has contributed significantly to the pathogenesis, pathophysiology and therapy of endocrine diseases. Over the past three decades, Dr. Shulman has conducted groundbreaking basic and clinical investigative studies on the cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance in humans that have led to several paradigm shifts in our understanding of Type 2 diabetes. His seminal discoveries and their clinical translation are leading to development of exciting new strategies to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes. Shulman resides in New Haven.

The Endocrine Society is based in Chevy Chase, Md. For more information, go to www.endo-society.org.

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Report says marketing of sugary drinks to youths on the rise


A new report by the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity says that the marketing of sugary sodasLink and other soft drinks has increased in the last several years and is targeted toward children and teenagers, especially toward minority and low-income youths. Read the story on nhregister.com. The report and a response from the American Beverage Association are attached.

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